Thursday, February 12th, 2009

 

Summary:  0.1” snow total in Waterbury (495’) as of 7:00 P.M. EST

 

Based on what I saw from UVM in Burlington today, it looked like snow started in the Northern Greens at around 1:00 P.M. or so, and by 3:00 P.M. the white wall of precipitation against the mountains was more apparent.  I got back to Waterbury a bit before 5:00 P.M. and found that the temperature was 36 F, but the precipitation was still rain.  However, I could see that there was snow falling not too far above us in the mountains, probably in the 1,000 – 2,000’ elevation range.  The first signs of changeover to snow I saw down at this elevation were around 5:30 P.M. when the boys and I popped into town to grab some subs – there were clearly ice crystals in the raindrops on the windshield, so I suspected that the valley changeover to snow wasn’t far away.  By 6:00 P.M. we had changed over to snow at the house, but our temperatures are still marginal (34.3 F as of 7:00 P.M.) and we’ve only got a slushy 0.1 to 0.2 inches of accumulation on the snowboard so far.  I did collect the liquid portion of the this event in my rain gauge, which revealed 0.11" of liquid in the Wednesday evening period, 0.33" in the Wednesday overnight, and 0.41" today for a total of 0.85 inches.  It was raining pretty hard at times here in the valley this afternoon/evening, and it appears as though this has translated into some dense accumulations of snow in the mountains.

 

J.Spin

 

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Summary:  0.9” snow total in Waterbury (495’) as of 10:00 P.M. EST

 

I took a peek outside at 10:00 P.M. and the snow is falling with some impressive intensity now; the flakes are about 3-4 mm in diameter.  We’re still above freezing (33.3 F) down here in the valley but the snow is certainly accumulating; I measured 0.9 inches on the board as of 10:00 P.M.  With the mountains’ lower temperatures and additional upslope enhancement, it will be interesting to see what they pick up tonight.  The snow we’ve received down here is fairly dense at this point, so there should be a decent amount of liquid put down with this snow.  I’m not sure if the back end of the radar image below will be the last snow we see with this event, but unless the intensity really drops off, we should have some additional accumulation to go this evening.

 

J.Spin

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Friday, February 13th, 2009

 

Summary:  1.2” snow total in Waterbury (495’) as of 6:00 A.M. EST

 

Friday, February 13th, 2009:  6:00 A.M. update from Waterbury, VT

 

New Snow:  1.2 inches

Liquid Equivalent:  0.17 inches

Snow/Water Ratio:  7.1

Snow Density:  14.2% H2O

Temperature:  20.3 F

Humidity:  67%

Dew Point:  8.4 F

Barometer:  29.85 in. Hg

Wind:  Calm

Sky:  Light Snow

Storm snow total:  1.2 inches

Storm liquid equivalent total:  0.17” snow/0.85” rain/1.02” total

Current snow at the stake:  18 inches

Season snowfall total:  130.6 inches

 

Last night’s snow at the house tapered down in intensity during its final hour, and it also contained some graupel, so there appeared to be just a couple tenths of an inch of additional accumulation as the back edge of the radar returns moved through.  The snow did wind up adding almost two tenths of an inch of liquid atop the snowpack however.  I had emptied the rain gauge not long before the precipitation changed over to snow, but I didn’t have time to melt down its contents this morning, so if there is any additional liquid in there above what was collected on the snowboard, I’ll add that on to the rain value for this event.  This morning it seems that another small round of moisture was coming from somewhere, because steady light snow was falling in the Waterbury area, and based on the snowboard accumulation it hadn’t been falling all night.  In terms of the accumulations in the Burlington area, here on the UVM campus it looks like they picked up just a dusting of snow.  The accumulations I’ve seen for Vermont’s higher elevations from this event are up to a half a foot of snow as of this morning.  Below is a list of snow totals I’ve seen along the Green Mountain spine for those ski areas that have reported in so far, listed north to south:

 

Jay Peak: 3”

Smuggler’s: 3”

Stowe: 6”

Bolton: 6”

Sugarbush: 5”

Pico: 3”

Killington: 3”

Okemo: 3”

Stratton: 4”

Mount Snow: 1”

 

J.Spin

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On February 13th, 2009 at 7:34 A.M., J.Spin wrote:

 

“I had emptied the rain gauge not long before the precipitation changed over to snow, but I didn’t have time to melt down its contents this morning, so if there is any additional liquid in there above what was collected on the snowboard, I’ll add that on to the rain value for this event.”

 

I melted down and emptied the rest of the material in the rain gauge this evening to find that there were 0.30 inches of liquid in there, so that means there was an additional 0.13" of rain before the 0.17" of snow - updated storm totals are below:

 

Storm liquid equivalent total:  0.17” snow/0.98” rain/1.15” total

 

J.Spin