Friday, January 7th, 2011

 

 

I hadn’t looked at the NWS page yet this morning, but I heard Roger Hill mention that winter weather advisories had been extended into our county (Washington) so I stopped in for a look.  Our point forecast has us down for 3 to 6 inches of snow through tomorrow, and the BTV storm total graphic suggests about 5 inches of accumulation in our area.  For the southern part of our county (Waitsfield, Warren, Sugarbush, Mad River Glen, etc.) the forecast is a bit higher and is calling for 4 to 8 inches.  Roger mentioned that the more northern areas will get into the action as we head farther into the weekend and upslope comes into play, affecting Jay Peak in the north, southward through Smuggler’s Notch, Stowe, Bolton Valley, Mad River Glen, and Sugarbush.  Hopefully the mountains can maximize the initial synoptic storm and upslope to get a decent dump, because we’re moving into the heard of the ski season and they could use it.  With the complexity of the storm system it should be interesting to see where the snow totals wind up by the end of the weekend.

 

http://jandeproductions.com/2011/07JAN11A.jpg

 

http://jandeproductions.com/2011/07JAN11B.jpg

 

 

Event totals: 0.5” Snow/0.05” L.E.

Friday 1/7/2011 10:00 P.M. update:  For much of the day in
Burlington, I could see the low clouds and snow flirting with the mountains, especially those south of I-89 as forecast, but the snow never seemed to get too serious.  A bit before 5:00 P.M. however, snow actually started to fall in Burlington; the flakes were very small but the snowfall was steady.  The snowfall actually tapered off once I reached Williston to the west, and only rematerialized once I passed Richmond and headed into the mountains.  The snowfall disappeared one more time in the Bolton flats area before returning around the Bolton/Waterbury line as I approached the house.

 

In the evening we popped over to the outdoor ice rink in the center of town and it was a classic scene with the snow coming down.  I kept humming the Charlie Brown Christmas song from the skating scene to myself.  The snowfall was steady, but the flakes very small – I found the flakes to be in the 1 mm range or even smaller.  Even the small flakes looked cool in the rink lights though; I took several pictures and added one below:

 

http://jandeproductions.com/2011/07JAN11C.jpg


Once back at the house I was in no rush to check the snowboard since the snow was accumulating so slowly, but I finally decided to take a measurement at 10:00 P.M. as the flake size seemed to be bumping up a bit to the 3 mm range.  With such small flakes I wasn’t too surprised to find that the snow was a fairly standard 10% H2O.  Some details from the 10:00 P.M. observations are below:

New Snow: 0.5 inches
New Liquid: 0.05 inches
Snow/Water Ratio: 10.0
Snow Density: 10.0%
Temperature: 21.9 F
Sky: Light Snow (1-3 mm flakes)
Snow at the stake: 6.5 inches

 

 

powderfreak, on 07 January 2011 - 07:22 PM, said:

How are you guys doing snowfall-to-date relative to normal? It has been a bit sparse at times but I was talking to NZucker about this recently how BTV is just above normal to date. Yesterday they were like 2" above normal-to-date and 8" above normal since December 1. They'll probably add to that with this little system. The only reason they aren't more above normal is because of the crappy November... but BTV airport in the Champlain Valley pulled 28" in December.

I'm curious as to what J.Spin is relative to the past 5 seasons or so that he's lived at his location... I don't think snowfall has been all that bad in NW New England, and the general 15-30" (isolated higher amounts) from the early December upslope event really helped this area. Have had solid snow cover since December 5th. Though there does seem to be an area in central VT, central NH, up through the ME coastal plain that has been having a harder time getting it to snow... the Boxing Day storm really helped that corridor.

 

I mentioned a little about this in a message on Tuesday (1/4).  At that point we had just passed 50 inches of snowfall for the season, but we were still 15 inches below my calculated average.  The clipper helped out some, and now we’re at 55.5 inches and only about 12 inches below average.  That’s still just keeping pace for the most part, not really getting ahead, and certainly not on a 2007-2008 La Nina pace (97.2 inches by this date).  Depending on how the next few days play out though, we could make a little more ground, we’ll just have to see.

 

For reference, the running seasonal snowfall averages I have for dates in this timeframe are as follows:

 

January 4th   65.4”

January 5th   65.9”

January 6th   66.4”

January 7th   67.7”

January 8th   70.2”

January 9th   70.9”

 

 

Saturday, January 8th, 2011

 

 

Event totals: 1.4” Snow/0.13” L.E.

Saturday 1/8/2011 6:00 A.M. update:  Consistent with the slightly larger flake sizes (1 to 3 mm vs. ~1 mm earlier) that I’ve been seeing as we moved toward the overnight period, the snow density is down a touch from 10.0% H2O to 8.9% H2O with the 6:00 A.M. analysis.  However, as I was finishing up my observations and coming inside, the flake size really started to increase, with some flakes up to ¾ inch in diameter.  I wasn’t sure if we were moving into some upslope precipitation or not, but looking at the radar, it seems that we are actually getting hit by that moisture stream from the south, which has finally rotated enough that we are in the flow:

 

http://jandeproductions.com/2011/08JAN11A.gif

 

http://jandeproductions.com/2011/08JAN11B.gif

 

We are well downstream in the flow, but we’ll see how much moisture makes it this far.  Some details from the 6:00 A.M. observations are below:

New Snow: 0.9 inches
New Liquid: 0.08 inches
Snow/Water Ratio: 11.3
Snow Density: 8.9%
Temperature: 21.9 F
Sky: Light Snow (1-3 mm flakes)
Snow at the stake: 7.0 inches

 

 

I checked the snowboard and as of about 9:00 A.M. there was another inch on there, bringing the event total to 2.4 inches at this location.  The recent accumulation rate was definitely faster than we’ve seen so far with this event, and it may be due to the increased flake size vs. just the amount of moisture hitting us.  We’ll see what the liquid analysis says when I next check the board.  There’s been a lull in the snowfall over the past half hour or so, so we’ll also have to see if it picks up again.  Our NWS point forecast has us down for 3 to 6 additional inches through Sunday, with half of that expected tomorrow.  It sounds like they are anticipating a northwest upslope flow to develop, so that’s where some of that would come from:

 

.SHORT TERM /7 PM THIS EVENING THROUGH MONDAY/...

AS OF 415 AM EST SATURDAY...UPPER LOW WILL PASS EAST OF NEW ENGLAND OVERNIGHT AND SNOW SHOWERS WILL CONTINUE WITH A FOCUS OVER THE HIGHER ELEVATIONS AS FLOW TURNS TO THE NORTHWEST. REGION WILL REMAIN UNDER THE INFLUENCE OF DEPARTING UPPER LOW THROUGH EARLY MONDAY MORNING WITH NORTHWEST FLOW REMAINING. LIGHT ACCUMULATIONS EACH PERIOD EXPECTED...ESPECIALLY THE NORTHWEST FACING SLOPES AND HIGHER ELEVATIONS.

 

 

 

Event totals: 3.0” Snow/0.24” L.E.

Saturday 1/8/2011 12:00 P.M. update:  It was snowing decently with some larger flakes at the house in the mid to late morning period, so I decided to head up to the mountain to make some turns and see what conditions were like.  The powder depths I observed up there are actually a combination of the fluffy snow from the clipper earlier in the week, with this denser snow from the current Great Lakes ULL/inverted trough on top of it.  In
Bolton’s Timberline area up to the mid station (1,500’ to 2,250’) I found 4 to occasionally 5 inches of powder, but up at the Timberline summit there was a consistent 5 to 7 inches atop the consolidated snow from before the warmth.  On the main mountain at around 2,300’ I found 6 inches of powder, and even up at the Vista Summit (3,100’) I never found more than 7 inches.  Toward the end of the day we went out for a tour on the Nordic/backcountry network and I found generally 6 inches of loose snow in the 2,000’ to 2,500’ range.

 

Down at the house (495’) we picked up some additional snow during the morning, and with some larger flakes, at least at times, the snow density dropped another couple of percent down to 6.9% H2O.  By that point we’d received about a quarter inch of liquid for the event.  Some details from the noontime observations are below:

New Snow: 1.6 inches
New Liquid: 0.11 inches
Snow/Water Ratio: 14.5
Snow Density: 6.9%
Temperature: 27.3 F
Sky: Light Snow (1 mm flakes)
Snow at the stake: 8.0 inches

 

After noon, the snow really shut off, and we even had a few breaks of sunshine.  Up on the mountain there was a burst of snow when we started our backcountry tour at around 3:00 P.M., but for the most part the snow was very light until we were leaving around 4:30 – 5:00 P.M. and it picked up a little.  Flakes were very small (1-2 mm) on the mountain the entire time.  Since noon there’s only been a couple of tenths of additional snow accumulation here at the house, and most of that seems to have come from this evening where we’ve had some slightly larger flakes falling.

 

Looking ahead to tomorrow, BTV has new advisories up for the western slopes from 5:00 A.M. tomorrow through 10:00 A.M. Monday for upslope snow, and the focus of the expected snowfall is very clear on the storm total snowfall maps.  Washington County isn’t actually in this advisory, but our NWS point forecast calls for 2 to 6 inches through tomorrow night and the storm total map has the Chittenden County/Washington County border in our area at around 6 inches.  I added a bit of the afternoon NWS discussion along with their warning and accumulations maps below:

 

.SHORT TERM /7 AM SUNDAY MORNING THROUGH MONDAY NIGHT/...

AS OF 315 PM EST SATURDAY...ANOTHER INTERESTING SETUP TAKING SHAPE ONCE AGAIN DURING SUNDAY/SUNDAY NIGHT TIME FRAME AS UPPER LOW SHIFTS EAST/OFFSHORE... MARITIME CYCLONE OCCLUDES AND NORTH/NORTHWESTERLY FLOW DEEPENS. THIS WILL ALLOW CONTINUED OROGRAPHICAL ENHANCEMENT OF LIGHT SNOWS ACROSS THE NWRN DACKS/NWRN GREENS AND PORTIONS OF THE VT CHAMPLAIN VALLEY. INDEED...MODELS DEPICT TO VARYING DEGREES AT LEAST A PERIOD OF MORE ENHANCED ACTIVITY DURING 18Z SUN TO 06Z MONDAY TIME FRAME AS STRONGER UPPER SHORTWAVE PASSAGE COMBINED WITH MOISTURE OF MARITIME ORIGIN WRAPS BACK SOUTH/SOUTHWESTWARD INTO OUR AREA. BASED ON HISTORICALLY HIGHER THAN NORMAL SNOW TO LIQUID SNOW RATIOS FOR THESE SCENARIOS (AROUND 20:1 OR A TAD HIGHER) HAVE OPTED TO ISSUE A WINTER WX ADVSY FOR THE NWRN SLOPES OF THE ADIRONDACKS...AS WELL AS THE WESTERN SLOPES OF THE NRN GREENS AND THE EASTERN PORTIONS OF THE CHAMPLAIN VALLEY OF NRN VT DURING THIS TIME FRAME. MAINLY LOOKING AT A PROLONGED LIGHT SNOW EVENT HERE...OFFERING 3-7 INCHES IN THE NWRN DACKS...AND 4 TO 8 ACROSS THE VT PORTIONS OF THE ADVSY (LOCALLY HIGHER)...THOUGH HEAVIER ACCUM HERE SHOULD BE GENERALLY EAST OF BURLINGTON.

 

http://jandeproductions.com/2011/08JAN11A.jpg

 

http://jandeproductions.com/2011/08JAN11B.jpg

 

http://jandeproductions.com/2011/08JAN11C.jpg

 

 

We haven't been hit hard with the inverted trough here in Northern VT like some places in CT, but we've had at least some snow to add on top of the fluff from the clipper earlier in the week.  With the new snow I popped up to the mountain for some lift-served runs in the late morning, and then I headed back up with the family when we went for a tour on the Nordic/BC network in the mid to late afternoon.  It looks like the western slopes have an upslope event coming in tomorrow, with some decent accumulations expected for the mountains.  Anticipated snowfall maps for the next event are below, along with some of my Waterbury and Bolton observations from today in my latest report at AmericanWx.com:

 

 

Sunday, January 09, 2011

 

 

Event totals: 5.1” Snow/0.29” L.E.

Sunday 1/9/2011 6:00 A.M. update:  I cleared the snowboard last night at 10:00 P.M., and it had 0.2” snow on it comprised of 0.01” liquid.  That was presumably the last accumulation from that part of the storm.  I don’t know when the next round of snowfall started, but when I checked this morning a fresh 1.9” of very dry, upslope-style snow had accumulated.  We are definitely into a different portion of the storm now, because the flakes are consistently larger than anything I’ve seen the past couple of days, and the snowfall rate is high.  I don’t think it’s quite 1”/hr., but it’s up there due to the large flakes.  Very consistent with BTV’s projected accumulations map, a sharp cutoff of precipitation is visible on the radar along the Green Mountain spine, even in composite mode.

 

http://jandeproductions.com/2011/09JAN11A.gif

 

Checking the latest NWS discussion for the near term, the snowfall activity is expected to be higher when a potent shortwave comes through this afternoon, so we will see how the snowfall plays out later:

 

.NEAR TERM /UNTIL 7 PM THIS EVENING/...

AS OF 330 AM EST SUNDAY...UPPER LEVEL LOW OVER SOUTHERN NY WILL CONTINUE TO SLOWLY MOVE EAST TODAY...MOISTURE BEGINS TO WRAP AROUND THIS SYSTEM AND MOVE INTO OUR FORECAST AREA FROM THE NORTH. POTENT SHORTWAVE WILL DROP SOUTH ACROSS THE CWA BETWEEN 18Z AND 00Z MONDAY. SNOW WILL INCREASE DURING THIS TIME PERIOD...ESPECIALLY ACROSS THE HIGHER ELEVATIONS AND THE NORTHWEST FACING SLOPES OF THE DACKS AND GREENS. OROGRAPHIC ENHANCEMENT OF LIGHT SNOW WILL BE EVIDENT. FIRST PART OF THE DAY TODAY WILL BE QUIETER UNTIL THAT SHORTWAVE ENTERS THE REGION.

 

Some details from the 6:00 A.M. observations are below:

New Snow: 1.9 inches
New Liquid: 0.04 inches
Snow/Water Ratio: 47.5
Snow Density: 2.1%
Temperature: 23.9 F
Sky: Snow (3-7 mm flakes)
Snow at the stake: 9.5 inches

 

 

powderfreak, on 09 January 2011 - 01:14 PM, said:

Nice, J... up to 9.5" at the stake is pretty decent right now all things considered! I'm still amazed at how much snow your area gets for being only 400-500ft in elevation.

 

Some of it is our upslope fluff of course, so it’s not like an equivalent snowpack made entirely of dense stuff, but it’s hard to complain about the number at the stake with the way the season has gone (it’s actually up to 13" as of the 6:00 P.M. observations - more on that below).  We definitely do well with snowfall for such low elevation, and after observing what goes on here for a few seasons I can think of a couple key reasons.  One is that we are so sheltered and out of the wind, the dumps, especially the upslope ones come with ridiculous loft.  Today was a perfect example.  When we left Stowe it was like a blizzard with heavy snow and 20-30 MPH winds.  We got back here to the house it was dead calm and dumping some massive 1"+ flakes.  I walked through the snow out back while making my measurements and it was like air - I haven't run the numbers yet, but even though there was a half foot of it, I bet it was still just a few percent H2O.  Even laying one of my ground snowboards down as gently as I could, it just crushed the stuff.  The other thing that helps with the snowfall here is that we’re in sort of a sweet spot that can get in on the best of the “west of the Greens” and the “east of the Greens” microclimates.  Sometimes we still get in on the warming with the “west of the Greens” microclimate, but that’s the way it goes.

 

powderfreak, on 09 January 2011 - 01:14 PM, said:

I'm at the SLC airport getting ready to fly back and am looking forward to returning to more snow! Talking with folks at Stowe it seems as though we've been in a classic snow-showery pattern with 15" at the summit over the past week, coming in 2-4" bursts. Looks like we'll add to it, too!
Winter Weather Advisory just issued by BTV for the Green Mountain spine and adjacent areas... classic upslope flow FTW

 

I think you’re going to be happy with what’s been going on around here this afternoon.  It was getting windy at Stowe so it was a little hard to tell, but it must have been dumping at over an inch an hour because in the noon to 6:00 P.M. period we picked up 6.1 inches even down here at the house – and it’s still dumping at an inch an hour.  I’m not sure how long it’s going to keep up at this rate, but the advisory goes through 10:00 A.M. tomorrow.  In any event, it’s going to help us in terms of getting closer to average for snowfall, even if it’s fluff and doesn’t quite get us there in terms of total liquid in the snowpack.  I’ll put together my updates and a couple of pictures in a bit.

 

 

 

Event totals: 12.3” Snow/0.47” L.E.

Sunday 1/9/2011 6:00 P.M. update:  As of noontime today we had accumulated 1.1 inches of new snow, and then I was able to clear the snowboard before we headed to Stowe for the afternoon.  There was steady snow on the mountain all afternoon and into the evening, and it seemed to increase as time went on.  I bet it was above an inch per hour at times, although it was a bit tough to tell with the wind; winds were certainly in the 20 to 30 MPH range when they were ramped up.  I didn’t know if the same heavy snowfall was hitting the valleys, but I was very curious to see what was going on at the house.  On the way home, the intensity of the snowfall dropped off a bit as we headed down into Stowe Village, but for the most part it really kept up with decent snowfall all along the east side of the Greens through Waterbury Center, Colbyville, and then through Waterbury to the house.

 

http://jandeproductions.com/2011/09JAN11A.jpg

 

It was obvious that we’d picked up a good shot of afternoon snow at the house as we plowed our way up the driveway, and I found 6.1 inches of snow on the snowboard comprised of 0.14 inches of liquid.  It was very fluffy stuff that you could barely feel as you walked through it.  The 6.1 inches was actually the largest individual accumulation I’ve seen on the board so far this season, whether accumulated in 6-hour, 12-hour, or even 24-hour intervals.  The flakes (or aggregates in actuality) that were falling from the sky were huge, with some up to an inch in diameter.  I went with a range of 5 to 25 mm diameters based on what I saw.

 

http://jandeproductions.com/2011/09JAN11B.jpg

 

With that accumulation this event pulled into a tie with the 12/12/2010-12/18/2010 event for second largest of the season, but it’s continued to snow at about an inch per hour, so this one has now taken sole possession of the number two spot.  The running season snowfall average I have for this date is 70.9 inches, and 72.0 inches for tomorrow, so if this snowfall keeps up it might be possible to catch up to average.  If that happened, it would be the first time this season.  Either way, we’re at least getting closer.

 

Some details from the noontime and 6:00 P.M. observations are below:

1/9/2011 - 12:00 P.M. observations
New Snow: 1.1 inches
New Liquid: 0.04 inches
Snow/Water Ratio: 27.5
Snow Density: 3.6%
Temperature: 25.3 F
Sky: Snow (2-3 mm flakes)
Snow at the stake: 9.5 inches

 

1/9/2011 - 6:00 P.M. observations
New Snow: 6.1 inches
New Liquid: 0.14 inches
Snow/Water Ratio: 43.6
Snow Density: 2.3%
Temperature: 21.6 F
Sky: Snow (5-25 mm flakes)
Snow at the stake: 13.0 inches

 

 

Monday, January 10, 2011

 

 

Event totals: 16.7” Snow/0.60” L.E.

Monday 1/10/2011 12:00 A.M. update:  I’m up doing some work so I went out for 12:00 A.M. observations.  It has still been coming down quite steadily over the past six hours (4.4 inches), although not quite as intensely as the previous accumulation period.  With the way the snowfall has been so heavy, I was surprised that the NWS didn’t go with a Winter Storm Warning for this event, but I checked their page and they now have Winter Storm Warnings up for eastern Chittenden and Addison Counties and they have also updated their storm total snowfall maps.

 

DISCUSSION FROM 929 PM EST SUNDAY... COMPOSITE RADAR LOOP SHOWING BANDS OF HEAVY SNOW ALONG THE WESTERN SLOPES OF THE GREEN MOUNTAINS. JUST GOT A REPORT IN UNDERHILL VERMONT FROM AN OFF DUTY NWS EMPLOYEE OF 2.5 INCHES OF SNOW IN THE PAST HOUR. HAVE ALSO RECEIVED SEVERAL OTHER REPORTS OF HEAVY SNOWFALL AS WELL. THUS...HAVE UPGRADED THE WINTER WEATHER ADVISORY TO A WINTER STORM WARNING ACROSS EASTERN CHITTENDEN AND EASTERN ADDISON COUNTIES IN VERMONT. ALSO JUST RECEIVED A REPORT FROM A RETIRED NWS EMPLOYEE OF 4 INCHES AT KILLINGTON VERMONT...WITH HEAVY SNOW THERE. MAY NEED TO EXPAND WINTER WEATHER ADVISORY TO EASTERN RUTLAND AND WASHINGTON COUNTIES IN VERMONT...SO THERE MAY BE ANOTHER UPDATE COMING TO THIS FORECAST IN AWHILE

 

As noted above, if it’s snowing more than twice as hard in Underhill as it is here, they are getting quite a shot of snow.  It will be interesting to see how accumulations go with this event; folks taking just 24-hour measurements are going to have notably lower totals than those reading at smaller intervals because this snow is so dry.  It settles really fast; evidenced by the fact that there were 13.0 inches at the stake at 6:00 P.M., we picked up 4.4 additional inches, and the snow at the stake is only 14.5 inches now.  The 12:00 A.M. observations are below followed by the WSW text and the updated maps

 

New Snow: 4.4 inches
New Liquid: 0.13 inches
Snow/Water Ratio: 33.8
Snow Density: 3.0%
Temperature: 18.1 F
Sky: Snow (3-15 mm flakes)
Snow at the stake: 14.5 inches

 

URGENT - WINTER WEATHER MESSAGE

NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE BURLINGTON VT

1100 PM EST SUN JAN 9 2011

 

VTZ017-018-101200-

/O.CON.KBTV.WS.W.0001.000000T0000Z-110110T1500Z/

EASTERN CHITTENDEN-EASTERN ADDISON-

INCLUDING THE CITIES OF...UNDERHILL...BRISTOL...RIPTON

1100 PM EST SUN JAN 9 2011

 

...WINTER STORM WARNING REMAINS IN EFFECT UNTIL 10 AM EST

MONDAY...

 

THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE IN BURLINGTON CONTINUES THE WINTER

STORM WARNING...UNTIL 10 AM EST MONDAY.

 

* LOCATIONS...EASTERN CHITTENDEN AND EASTERN ADDISON COUNTIES IN

  VERMONT ALONG THE WESTERN SLOPES OF THE GREEN MOUNTAINS.

 

* HAZARD TYPES...MODERATE TO HEAVY SNOW.

 

* ACCUMULATIONS...4 TO 8 INCHES OF SNOW IS EXPECTED OVERNIGHT...

  WITH A STORM TOTAL SNOW ACCUMULATION OF 8 TO 12 INCHES...WITH

  SOME LOCALLY HIGHER AMOUNTS POSSIBLE.

 

* TIMING...SNOW WILL CONTINUE ACROSS THE WARNING AREA OVERNIGHT

  INTO MONDAY MORNING BEFORE TAPERING OFF BY MONDAY AFTERNOON.

 

* IMPACTS...DIFFICULT TRAVEL CONDITIONS EXPECTED THROUGH MONDAY

  MORNING...ESPECIALLY ACROSS HIGHER TERRAIN AREAS.

 

* WINDS...WEST 10 TO 15 MPH WITH GUSTS UP TO 25 MPH.

 

* TEMPERATURES...LOWS IN THE TEENS.

 

PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS...

 

PLEASE STAY TUNED TO NOAA WEATHER RADIO...YOUR LOCAL MEDIA...OR

GO TO WWW.WEATHER.GOV/BURLINGTON FOR FURTHER UPDATES ON THIS

WEATHER SITUATION.

 

http://jandeproductions.com/2011/10JAN11A.jpg

 

http://jandeproductions.com/2011/10JAN11B.jpg

 

http://jandeproductions.com/2011/10JAN11C.jpg

 

 

Event totals: 17.3” Snow/0.61” L.E.

We picked up 0.6 inches of snow in the 12:00 A.M. to 6:00 A.M. timeframe, since around here the snow quickly wound down after midnight.  It was a nice event though, bringing the season snowfall total at this location to 72.3 inches, which is just ahead of the average of 72.0 inches I have calculated for the date.  Since so much of it has been fluff though, we are presumably behind on liquid as the mountain snowpack would suggest.  There were a couple of nice examples of the fluff factor in the snow this morning.  The first was that even with another 0.6 inches of snowfall, the snow depth at the stake is already a half inch lower than it was at midnight.  The other was that when I was running the snow thrower this morning, wherever the snow landed it would cause a good chunk of this recent accumulation to simply implode.  The effect was that in many spots where I threw snow, the snowpack is not nearly as deep as the surrounding area.  I’ve seen this effect before, but this morning was one of the most dramatic examples.  Details from the 6:00 A.M. observations are below:

 

New Snow: 0.6 inches
New Liquid: 0.01 inches
Snow/Water Ratio: 60.0
Snow Density: 1.7%
Temperature: 16.0 F
Sky: Light Snow (1-3 mm flakes)
Snow at the stake: 14.0 inches

 

 

I still have to finish up reports from the weekend, but as forecast we had a nice upslope event yesterday afternoon into the night with some of that ridiculously dry Champlain Powder™.  It was really coming down hard at Stowe all afternoon.  Some details, comments on the new snowfall are in the NNE thread at Americanwx.com.  It looks like weekend storm totals for some of the central and northern mountains are in the 1.5 to 2 foot range.

 

 

Tuesday, January 11, 2011

 

 

Event totals: 17.9” Snow/0.61” L.E.

Tuesday 1/11/2011 6:00 A.M. update:  I got home yesterday evening to find another tenth of an inch of snow on the board from the day’s activity, and figured that would mark the end of our event.  Well, I guess that wasn’t quite the end because there was another half inch of snow out there this morning, and the NWS discussed its origin in their near term discussion from this morning:

 

.NEAR TERM /UNTIL 7 PM THIS EVENING/...

AS OF 622 AM EST TUESDAY...LOW LEVEL NORTHWEST FLOW AND MOISTURE HAVE COMBINED FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF LIGHT UPSLOPE SNOWS IN THE EASTERN PORTIONS OF THE CHAMPLAIN VALLEY/WEST SLOPES OF THE GREEN MOUNTAINS. ALBEIT LIGHT...THE SNOW WILL PERSIST AND HAVE UPDATED THE FORECAST TO MENTION LIGHT SNOW THIS MORNING WITH ACCUMULATIONS OF AN INCH OR LESS OVER PARTS OF NORTHWEST AND NORTH CENTRAL VERMONT. WILL CONTINUE TO SEE THE CHANCE OF LIGHT SNOW FOR NORTHEAST VERMONT TODAY AS WELL. EXPECT PLENTY OF CLOUD COVER ALONG WITH TEMPERATURES DOWN A BIT FROM SEASONAL NORMALS...GENERALLY IN THE UPPER TEENS TO MID 20S.

 

I hadn’t really planned on having to do anything other than check the stake this morning, so I was rushing around a bit but got everything done.  I couldn’t get measurable water out of either yesterday’s or today’s accumulations, so that made it a bit easier and they both went down as traces of liquid.  The snowpack continues to settle from the recent fluff – 13.0 inches last night at 8:00 P.M., and 12.5 inches as of this morning.  With no obvious new event taking place I’ve rolled these accumulations into the back end of the weekend system, and it appears as though there may be one more addition to the total today – when I left the house it was still snowing.  It was actually pretty steady snowfall.  Although still in the light category, there were flakes up to ¾” in diameter so there might be additional fluff to add this evening.

 

After that, it should be at the break point for getting accumulations on the mid week Nor’easter.  The BTV NWS storm total map has us down for what looks like 3-4 inches, and Roger Hill indicated about 2-5 inches for the Barre/Montpelier area in his morning broadcast.  There is some Northwest upslope flow coming in after that, so we’ll have to see what else falls.  Then Roger talked about the system this weekend, and then another potential one the middle of next week, so it sounds like there will be a lot to watch.

 

For now, we are actually keeping pace with average snowfall at this point at our location, which means about an inch a day according to my records for this part of the season.  I’m not sure if we’ve really had a hit from a big synoptic all-snow storm yet this season as far as I can recall, but thanks to upslope flow, December came in about average for snowfall, and January is doing OK as well so far.  Were it not for the poor November we would actually be riding ahead of average.

 

 

Wednesday, January 12, 2011

 

 

Event totals: 18.0” Snow/0.61” L.E.

 

We picked up a final tenth of an inch with yesterday’s snow shower activity to bring the total for that event to an even 18.0 inches.  Thanks to the big shot of upslope on Sunday it easily became our second largest event of the season.